Ogawara Shū  Attu  1945

Ogawara Shū                   Attu 1945

Fujita Tsuguharu   Attu 1943

Fujita Tsuguharu                        Attu 1943

via Twentieth Century Japanese Art and the Wartime State: Reassessing the Art of Ogawara Shū and Fujita Tsuguharu

Similar to the United States, Britain, Germany, Canada, and Australia, the Japanese government and military supported an extensive war art program involving hundreds of artists including:

  • Tsuguharu Foujita.[7]
  • Ryushi Kawabata, 1855–1966.[7]
  • Ryohei Koiso, 1903–1988.[7]
  • Shin Kurihara, 1894–1966.[7]
  • Saburo Miyamoto, 1905–1974.[7]
  • Kenichi Nakamura, 1895–1967.[7]
  • Kita Renzo (1876–1949)
  • Konosuke Tamura, 1903–1986.[7]
  • Kenji Yoshioka, 1906–1990.[7]

 

In 1951 the United States confiscated one hundred fifty three propaganda battle paintings that had been commissioned by the Japanese Imperial Army, Navy, and Air Force between 1937 and 1945. In 1967 photographer Nakagawa Ichirō  found a collection of War Campaign Record Paintings at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio and the  general public was introduced to the paintings once again.